FTC and Google – no market, no foul

January 4, 2013

By Doug Miller

In reading the coverage of the FTC announcement that it was not going to pursue any real action against Google for favoritism of its own products in the web search market, I was surprised to see how few commentators have raised the point that there can’t be a search “market” when no one pays for that service. And that the users of web search are, in fact, the product that Google sells to the consumers of the market it does monopolize – online advertising. Or the fact that by using its advertising revenues to provide services to users for free or greatly discounted it can collapse those markets and own them as well.
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FTC’s Google Safari Settlement: Impact on Government Computing

August 9, 2012

Why we need a criminal investigation to finish the job the FTC couldn’t

By Doug Miller

By just about any accepted definition, Google’s overriding of default security settlings and unauthorized intentional access of Apple’s Safari web browser on users’ systems that led to the recent FTC investigation and settlement should be considered illegal hacking that warrants criminal investigation. That is, Google surreptitiously loaded executable code onto users’ devices, ran that code to weaken the browser’s security settings, and then used the weakened security environment to load third-party cookies to enhance the relevance of ads displayed to the user. This was done to provide Google with revenue from the additional ads. Since advertising generates 96% of Google’s revenue, the motive for hacking seems clear. Hacking for profit is against the law. Google should not get a pass for what is a criminal act.
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